General structure
  • Writing a fill in the blank question requires a basic stem ending in a verb (e.g. The capital of the United states is). This prompts the learner for an answer. You write this stem in the question box. The stem is immediately followed by the answer that would complete the statement. Answers are indicated by inserting brackets around them.
  • An example of a fill in the blank question would be
The capital of the United states is [Washington, D.C.].


Multiple options
  • It is often good to provide multiple possible options as answers because answers can be stated in multiple ways. Multiple options can be indicated using a semi-colon (;). You can add as many alternate acceptable answers as needed.
  • An Example of a fill in the blank question with multiple options would be
The capital of the United states is [Washington, D.C.;Washington;DC;D.C.;Washington DC; Washington, DC].


What makes a good fill in the blank question
    • A fill in the blank questions or prompts are a very traditional form of testing that allow easy ways to get at what students have learned. While this type of question is taps fairly shallow knowledge and only rests recall, it does provide a fast way to assess basic knowledge. If you want to produce fill in the blank questions start by identifying the basic concepts. Then produce one sentence to explain each concept. Remove one key word or phrase for the learner to fill in.
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